U.S. Tourist Visa: How to Make your Chances of Approval Higher

by | February 13, 2015 | US Tourist Visa

For those foreign nationals who are not exempted from the Visa Waiver Program, they need to secure a tourist visa (B1 or B2) to travel to the United States for short visits, either for business or pleasure. Examples include tourism, vacation, visiting family and friends, medical treatment, business meeting, attending a business workshop, or personal leisure.

Normally, most applicants want to know their chances of approval before proceeding to apply. With this in mind, we came up with a list of documents that you may use to declare as proof of ties to help in convincing the consular officer that you are going back to your home country after the short visit.

The information listed below are for reference only and not to assure the approval of your tourist visa application. It is on the decision of the U.S. immigration officer whether to approve or to deny your visa application.

Here are few suggested proof of ties:

Employment

Having a job in your home country will not guarantee to have your visa issued. Immigration officers also look at the length of your current and previous employment, the type of job you have or had, and your current salary income.

The duration of requested visit to the US will also be measured, as Immigration Officers most likely question applicants who wish to stay for more couple of months. It’s important to consider the nature of your current job and the allowable leave your company issues, thus, you will need to provide Certificate of Employment stating your position, start date, current status, monthly or annual salary income, and leave certification. Providing this evidence will serve as a reference for the immigration officer who will evaluate your application.

Family Obligation

Examples of family obligations are elderly parents who need your presence to take care of their needs and obligation to take care of your child / children, especially when they are still going to school. The applicant should submit official documents establishing the family relationships, letters from physicians explaining important medical conditions of any dependent family members, and documents establishing the current school enrolment of the children.

You may also obtain supporting letters from family members, attesting that they will look after your loved ones while you are shortly away. This will help answer questions of the immigration officer as to who will take care of them if you go to the U.S.

Property and Personal Asset

Individuals are less likely to leave if they own a home, have property, or have large amounts of funds in investment accounts in their home country. While financial assets are required to establish the ability to support the visit, evidence of property and financial assets should also be provided as evidence that the applicant’s connections to the home country. Evidence can include ownership of real estate property, business, or house.

Community Involvement

Showing documents that you currently participate to your community may also increase your chances of getting your visa application approved. This may help convince the consular officer that you are happy with your involvement or obligation in a specific community activity and you are likely to return in your home country for this reason.

Travel History

If you have previously visited outside your home country for tourism, and have not overstayed or have followed your allowable stay provided by the juristic immigration, then you are more likely establishing a trust to the immigration officer that you will not overstay during your visit to the U.S. and that you will return to your home country after your vacation.

The more documentation that you submit to show that you will return to your home country, the better the chance for the approval of your visa.

 

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Category: US Tourist Visa

Cassie Polo

About the Author (Author Profile)

Cassie Polo is an article contributor and a frequent writer of Siam Legal US Visa Blog. She talks about immigration services and other immigration-related matters. Right now, Cassie assists applications for Canadian Visa and U.S. Visa at one of the law firms in Thailand.

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